Chapter 9

Nevada is not part of the South, but it has a close connection with its history. Many of Nevada’s early settlers had come from southern states, and preserved their loyalties. When war broke out, there was a lot of conflict between them and Nevada residents who supported the North. Confederate flags had to be prohibited, and the territory’s governor, James Nye, spoke up, forbidding people to voice opinions against the Union. Additionally, since all U.S. Army troops stationed in Nevada were transferred away to the war, the territory was left vulnerable to Indian attacks and heightened crime. A volunteer regiment was recruited to protect the roads, which had become increasingly vital, since all routes to the south were held by the Confederacy.

Virginia City, Nevada in 1861Virginia City, Nevada in 1861

Information from http://www.nevada-history.org/civil_war.html

Image from Google.

Published in: on 14 March, 2009 at 6:59 am  Comments (2)  

Nevada State Seal

This is the State Seal of Nevada

This is the State Seal of Nevada

The seal of Nevada was approved on November 29th, 1861. Allegedly, the original design had the smoke from the train going in one direction, and the smoke from the mill stack in another.

Information from nevada-history.org.

Image from Google.

Published in: on 14 March, 2009 at 6:20 am  Leave a Comment  

Chapter 8

Nevada is definitely not part of the Ozark or Appalachian region, so there is not a lot to say about this chapter, either. The mining in Nevada was never as pervasive or disruptive as in Appalachia, and Nevada’s culture was never as distinctive as the Ozarks’. The only paralled that might at all be appropriate is that Nevada was originally part of the Utah Territory, which was controlled by Mormons, who were (and still are) really conservative, so it might be considered that Nevada used to be really conservative, like the Ozarks and Appalachia. In fact, the reason Nevada was brought into statehood was because Lincoln thought it was a good idea to have two more Republican representatives. Until 1913, Nevada was overwhelmingly Republican, but since then it’s been pretty evenly split between Republicans and Democrats.

Senator Pat McCarran (D)Senator Pat McCarran (D)

Pat McCarran was a Democrat Senator from Nevada from 1933 to 1954. He was famous for his hatred and persecution of Communists, much like Wisconsin Senator Joe McCarthy. The Las Vegas airport is named after Pat McCarran.

Information from http://www.answers.com/topic/nevada

http://www.nevadaobserver.com/Nevada%20Political%20History%20(1912).htm

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_United_States_Senators_from_Nevada

Image from Google

Published in: on 6 March, 2009 at 3:27 am  Leave a Comment  

Nevada’s flag

This is the flag of the State of Nevada.

This is the flag of the State of Nevada.

Nevada has had four different flags since being admitted into the Union in 1864, during the Civil War. This is the most current one, adopted in 1991. The words “Battle Born” on the banner reflect the fact that Nevada became a state in wartime. The silver star commemorates Nevada’s state mineral, which is silver (even despite the large amounts of gold mined there in the 1800s.) The two vines are sagebrush, which is Nevada’s state flower.

Information from http://www.netstate.com/states/symb/flags/nv_flag.htm. Image from Google.

Published in: on 5 March, 2009 at 10:14 am  Leave a Comment  

Chapter 7

Since Nevada is not anywhere even near the Bypassed East, there is not a whole lot to say about it with reference to this chapter. The only characteristics Nevada shares with the Bypassed East region is its ruggedness, and mineral production. And while Nevada may have been a bypassed area at some point in time, it has, certainly, become a destination all its own in the 19th and 20th centuries.

Published in: on 5 March, 2009 at 8:54 am  Leave a Comment  

Nevada flora

Various species of pine, of which the single-leaf pinyon is the official state tree since 1953, dominate Nevada’s woodlands.
Nevada state tree

Nevada state tree

Creosote bush is common in southern Nevada, as are many kinds of sagebrush throughout the state.
Creosote branch

Creosote branch

An entire creosote

An entire creosote

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Wildflowers include shooting star and white and yellow violets.
A shooting star wildflower. It seems these open only at night, because I couldn't find any daytime pictures of them open.

Shooting star wildflower. It seems these only open at night, because I couldn't find any daytime pictures of them open.

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Information from http://www.city-data.com/states/Nevada-Flora-and-fauna.html and http://nevada-history.org/images/statetree.jpg&imgrefurl=http://nevada-history.org/icons.html&usg=__LAOCIewY4Wsj_x6f6-k3qcjOIVY=&h=204&w=168&sz=17&hl=en&start=6&um=1&tbnid=dZBqKY5C7QB9-M:&tbnh=105&tbnw=86&prev=/images%3Fq%3Dnevada%2Bstate%2Btree%2Bsingle-leaf%2Bpinon%26um%3D1%26hl%3Den%26sa%3DG
Images from Google.
Published in: on 27 February, 2009 at 12:31 am  Leave a Comment  

Chapter 5

Nevada is located pretty far outside the U.S. Manufacturing Core, and doesn’t have any of the traditional industries, like steel, iron, or coal. Its most profitable industry is gaming. The top five revenue-generating companies in Nevada are all gaming-product companies, with Bally and International Gaming Technologies commandeering two slots apiece.

Bally's is one of the top revenue-generating Nevada companies.

Bally's is one of the top revenue-generating Nevada companies.

One of IGT's gaming machine products.

One of IGT's gaming machine products.

In addition to gaming, Nevada also has printing and publishing businesses, some food-related manufacturers, concrete plants, and machinery factories.

A concrete plant in Nevada.

A concrete plant in Nevada.

Information from manta.com, and netstate.com. Pictures from Google.

Published in: on 23 February, 2009 at 12:12 am  Comments (8)  

Mining Activity

Nevada was home to a lot of mining activity from the very beginning. Archeologists have found Indian artifacts made from mined minerals dating back ten thousand years, or more. Between the fourth and sixth centuries, the Anasazi mined turquoise and salt in what is now Clark County. In 1849, Mormons travelling west discovered gold near Carson River, and in 1856, other Mormons found lead deposits near Old Las Vegas.

Nevada mining activity in 1866

Nevada mining activity in 1866

1861 to 1889 were especially productive years, with lead, zinc, copper, tungsten, and iron being mined along with gold and silver.

An old poster of a Nevada mining town.

An old poster of a Nevada mining town.

The 20th century had several active and passive periods, but is distinguished by the beginning of petroleum production. The general trend was to develop mines that would serve Nevada’s growing population, so, the focus was more on industrial minerals than gold and silver.

Information from http://www.nbmg.unr.edu/dox/nl/nl20.htm. Images from Google.

Published in: on 21 February, 2009 at 4:52 am  Leave a Comment  

Chapter 4

Until just a few decades ago, Nevada did not have any large cities at all.

This is one of Nevada's first cities in 1950.

This is one of Nevada's first cities, as it loked in 1950.

However, with the establishment of Las Vegas in the middle of the 20th century, and its subsequent rapid growth, Nevada is quickly catching up to more urbanized states. Between 2000 and 2006, Nevada’s population grew by almost 25% (http://quickfacts.census.gov/qfd/states/32000.html). At the same time, neighbor Arizona’s population increased by 20% (http://quickfacts.census.gov/qfd/states/04000.html). Perhaps the Las Vegas-Los Angeles-Phoenix triangle will be the Megalopolis of the 21st century.

Published in: on 15 February, 2009 at 11:52 am  Leave a Comment  

Early Settlement

Nevada mines in the 19th century.

Nevada mines in the 19th century.

Much of Nevada’s early settlement was done by prospectors. Here is a map of the mines being worked in 1865. I found this map on Google.

Published in: on 15 February, 2009 at 11:29 am  Leave a Comment